Electric car battery life: how long will my e-car last??

Without the battery, the electric car is not viable, it is the heart, so to speak, and accordingly important. If the battery breaks down, it can be really expensive. What can an electric car battery withstand and how can you help to increase its lifetime?? We have the info and good everyday tips for you.

To be able to travel longer distances with your e-car, the battery must be able to absorb and store a certain amount of energy. Currently, the batteries used have a storage capacity of between 40 and 100 kilowatt hours (kWh), depending on whether the car is a compact or an electric sports car. Is the fear of suffering battery damage really justified?

Table of contents
Manufacturer warranty on e-car battery
How long does an electric car battery last??
What is the cost of a battery for an e-car?
Battery life of electric cars
Increase

Manufacturer warranty on e-car battery

Just as with internal combustion engines, manufacturers also give warranties for e-cars. The battery is seen here separately and is therefore also provided with a separate warranty. However, the full storage performance is not guaranteed by any manufacturer, because it automatically decreases with the years. Here we have compiled for you the warranty of e-car batteries of all brands:

Brand Battery-
Warranty
guaranteed
Storage capacity
Tesla
View e-cars
up to 240.000 km
(depending on model) /
8 years
70 %
VW
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Renault
View e-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
k. A.
BMW
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
MINI
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
k. A.
KIA
View e-cars
150.000 km /
7 years
65 %
Skoda
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Peugeot
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Citroen
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Hyundai
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
k. A.
Fiat
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Jaguar
View e-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Audi
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Mercedes
View e-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Nissan
View electric cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Opel
View e-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Mazda
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
k. A.
Ford
View E-cars
k. A. k. A.
DS
View E-cars
k. A. k. A.
smart
View E-cars
100.000 km /
8 years
k. A.
Honda
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Volvo 160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Porsche
View E-cars
160.000 km /
8 years
70 %
Dacia
View E-cars
120.000 km /
8 years
k. A.

How long does an electric car battery last?

Currently, the life expectancy is assumed to be eight to ten years, which is approximately 500 to 1.000 charging cycles. An average range of 100 kilometers per charging process is assumed here, which then corresponds to a mileage of 50.000 to 100.000 kilometers would correspond to.

However, technology has also advanced greatly in the meantime, and a modern lithium-ion battery can run for up to 3.000 charging cycles well. An example here is the Tesla Model S, which in the ideal case with a battery over 300.000 kilometers.

After that, the remaining capacity can no longer be used in an e-car. If the capacity decreases, of course, the range also decreases, because the battery can store less energy. The more years the battery has on the hump, the more strongly the characteristic of the material changes, which provides in addition for a decrease of the range. Nevertheless, there is no need to be afraid of breaking down with your electric car.

E-car battery broken: How much does a battery damage cost??

It depends on the car and the size of the battery, but the battery is definitely the most expensive component in an electric car. Good 10.000 euros of the purchase price can make this out and if the battery breaks early, the repair is often so expensive that an economic total loss can be the result. Therefore, pay attention to a sufficient warranty of the car brands or lease the battery, if that is offered. In this case, the battery would simply be replaced if it has a defect.

In addition, it makes sense to take out comprehensive insurance, because normally a defect in the battery is also insured. To be on the safe side, ask your insurance company if there is a special tariff for the coverage of a broken e-car battery.

Increasing the battery life of electric cars

Everyone can help to increase the life of the e-car battery. You don’t have to read complicated care instructions for this at all, but rather adapt your own behavior to the electric car. An e-car is just not a classic car and has other needs to be adjusted to.

E-car battery full charge – avoid at all costs

Sounds strange, but that’s how it is. Charging an electric car to 100 percent can harm the battery more in the long run than it gives you in range. It is best to charge the battery only up to 80 percent at a time, because that will take you a long way and you don’t risk shortening the battery’s life even more.

No deep discharge

Also bad is a deep discharge of the electric car battery. Deep discharge is when the battery level drops below 20 percent. Ideally, you always keep the battery in a fairly constant state of charge of approx. 50 to 70 percent, that would be the e-car’s preference. It is obvious that this is difficult to implement in practice – you would have to recharge constantly. Therefore, at a minimum, make sure that the battery level does not fall below 20 percent.

Snoring charges are good for battery life

Of course, you want your electric car charged as quickly as possible, which is fine if you have to travel longer distances. But once you have time, it would be very beneficial for the battery’s life if you perform a so-called snore charge. This means that the e-car is not charged at a fast charging station, but simply at home. Slow charging is a pure boon for the battery in between charges.

E-car and cold: Charge immediately after the trip

If a battery has cooled down, it can age more quickly and therefore no longer absorb the same amount of energy as a battery that is at its comfortable temperature. However, after we will often have cold temperatures in our latitudes, you can make it easier for the battery by charging it immediately after driving when it is cold outside. Then the battery is still warmed up and recharges healthier and faster.

Avoid heat

If the battery is fully charged, a shady parking space is preferable to one in the blazing sun – the battery does not like too much heat. Therefore, a parking garage or a garage are highly recommended in the summer and the battery should rather not be charged completely in very hot temperatures. The battery feels most comfortable at temperatures of 15 to 25 degrees Celsius. A shady place is of course also ideal during the charging process.

Self-discharge: Avoid prolonged idle times

If you know that you will not be driving your e-car for a long period of time, it should be parked in a dry and protected place and the battery should have a medium charge level. If the car is parked for several months, it is important to check on the battery from time to time and, if necessary, to charge it to ca. 60 percent recharge. If this is observed, the battery can withstand even longer periods of standing without damage.

As a rule of thumb, an e-car’s battery will discharge by about four percent per month if the room temperature is appropriate. If it is too hot, it can quickly become double.

Driving an electric car economically

This point in particular is not likely to appeal to nimble drivers. The battery likes it best evenly. This means that heavy acceleration is not good for the battery in the long run. Sudden high power demands cause much of the stored energy to flow out of the battery and you have to charge more frequently. It is assumed that modern batteries can withstand between 500 and 1.000 charging processes without any problems until the capacity slowly decreases. Who must charge thus more frequently, accelerates this process additionally.

Battery management systems are useful

As a rule, the electric car has an intelligent battery management system that communicates with the home wallbox or charging station. This optimizes the charging current for the gentlest possible charging and automatically controls charging. The system terminates the process when the battery has reached the optimum state of charge of 80 percent, and during the charging process it monitors whether the individual cells have the correct voltage. If not, this is compensated by the so-called Balancing again.

If it is too cold outside, the system also registers this and automatically reduces the charging speed in order to protect the battery and prevent damage.

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